Franz Heinrich Haubrock
(1804-1887)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
Anna Maria Ilsabein Schäfer

Franz Heinrich Haubrock

  • Born: 12 Jan 1804, Hunnebrock, Duchy of Ravensburg, Prussia
  • Marriage: Anna Maria Ilsabein Schäfer on 13 May 1864 in Quincy, Adams Co., Illinois
  • Died: 27 Dec 1887, Quincy, Adams Co., Illinois at age 83

  General Notes:

Franz Heinrick HAUBROCK was born on January 12, 1804 in Hunnebrock in the Duchy of Ravensberg. He was the oldest child of Johann Herman HAUBROCK (spelled HOBROCK in older records), heuerling, and Clara Margarethe Ilse BRINKMANN. He was baptized in the church in Bunde. Like several generations of his family before him, Franz became a heuerling (farm Laborer).

On March 16, 1828 at age 23 Franz married Anne Marie Margarethe Ilsabein BROKER, age 24. She was the daughter of Johann Friedrich BROKER of Oetinghausen and Marie HOENER. The couple had two daughters: Hanne Christine born in Hunnebrock in 1828 and Anne Marie Ilsabein born in Laer in 1831. Anne Marie married Bernhard BRAKENSIEK in Schildesche in April, 1855. The following year a Consent Form was issued granting the Haubrocks and the Brakensieks legal permission to emigrate. They must have been inspired by Franz`s youngest brother Casper, who had emigrated to Quincy in 1853.

According to family tradition, Bernhard worked for an extra year to earn money for his parents-in-law`s passage so that they could accompany the Brakensieks to the United States. The two families settled in Quincy, Illinois. It appears that they must have left before the Consent Form was issued, since Franz was listed in the 1855-1856 Quincy City Directory. From 1855 through 1874 his address was at various times given as 14 South 8th, 8th east side 2 lots south of Payson, and 255 South 8th, which appears to be the same location with different numbering systems. There is currently no residence at that location. In 1876 his address was listed as northwest corner 9th and Washington, and in 1880 as 827 Washington. Throughout this period he was listed as a tailor working in his home. He also Americanized his name to Frank.

Early immigrants from the Herford area founded St. Jacobi Evangelical Lutheran Church (later called St. James), and many of the subsequent immigrants from that area joined this church when they arrived in Quincy. The Haubrocks also joined St. Jacobi and remained members for life. Frank`s wife Anne Marie died on October 26, 1863 at age 60.

On May 13, 1864 at age 60 Frank married Anna Marie Ilsabein STORK, a widow age 57. She had been born Anna Marie Ilsabein SCHAFFER in Eilshausen, Ravensberg in 1807. She married Cord Heinrich STORK, who had been born February 9, 1802 in Eilshausen, and who was a maker of spinning wheels. The couple had four sons and at least one daughter. They emigrated to the United States in 1854, arriving in Quincy on June 17. Three days later Cord died of cholera. Anna apparently remained a widow for ten years until she married Frank. She died November 4, 1879 at age 71 years, 10 months and 5 days.

Frank was not listed in the Quincy Directories after 1880-81, probably because he went to live with his daughter Hanne after his second wife died. He remained in good health until days before his death. He died of "cramps" on December 27, 1887 at age 83. At that time he was living at 1031 Vine (now College) with his daughter Hanne and her husband Gottlieb GNUSE, who had emigrated to Quincy in 1856. His obituary in the church records said that he was survived by one daughter, two sons-in-law, six grandchildren, three brothers and one sister. His funeral was held on December 29, at St. James Lutheran Church. There is no record of where he was buried. Biography by Arlene Brackensick

Franz married Anna Maria Ilsabein Schäfer on 13 May 1864 in Quincy, Adams Co., Illinois. (Anna Maria Ilsabein Schäfer was born in 1807 in Eilshausen, Herford, Westfalen, Germany and died on 4 Nov 1879 in Quincy, Adams Co., Illinois.)



Home | Table of Contents | Surnames | Name List

This Web Site was Created 12 Jul 2013 with Legacy 7.5 from Millennia