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King Sverre "the Priest" Sigurdsson
(1150-1202)
Astrid Roesdatter
(Abt 1160-)
King Håkon III Sverresson
(1180-1204)
Inge of Varteig in Eidsberg
(Abt 1175-1234)

King Håkon IV "The Old" Håkonsson
(1204-1263)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
1. Margrete Skulisdatter

2. Kanga den Unge "the young"

King Håkon IV "The Old" Håkonsson

  • Born: 1204, Falkenborg, Eidsberg, Østfold, Norway
  • Marriage (1): Margrete Skulisdatter on 25 May 1225 in Norway
  • Marriage (2): Kanga den Unge "the young" about 1220 in Norway
  • Died: 15 Dec 1263, Kirkwall, Orkney Islands at age 59
  • Buried: 1264, Bergen, Bergen, Hordaland, Norway

  General Notes:

King Håkon IV is Eric & Evan's 22th great-grandfather. From Free Encyclopedia online: Haakon IV, surnamed the Old (1204 - December 15, 1263), was declared to be the son of Haakon III of Norway, the leader of the Birkebeiner, who had seized control over large parts of Norway in 1202. During an ongoing civil war between Birkebeiner and Bagler, who resisted in the regions Viken and Oblandene, Haakon III died shortly before the former was born in Folkisberg, Østfold in 1204. When in 1206 the Bagler tried to take advantage of the situation and started hunting the heir, a group of Birkebeiner warriors fled with the child, heading for King Inge II of Norway in Nidaros (now Trondheim). On their way they came into a blizzard, and only the two mightiest warriors, Torstein Skevla and Skjervald Skrukka, continued on skis, carrying the child on the arm. They managed to bring the heir to safety. This event still is commemorated in Norway's most important annual skiing event, the Birkebeiner-Race. So the child was placed under the protection of King Inge II, after whose death in 1217 he was chosen king. The church refused to recognize him until 1223 on the ground of illegitimacy and the Pope's dispensation for his coronation was not gained until much later. In the earlier part of his reign much of the royal power was in the hands of Earl Skule, who intrigued against the king until 1239, when he proceeded to open hostility and was put to death. The rebellion also led to the death of Snorri Sturluson. From this time onward Haakon's reign was marked by more peace and prosperity than Norway had known for many years, until in 1263 a dispute with the Scottish king concerning the Hebrides, a Norwegian possession, induced Haakon to undertake an expedition to the west of Scotland. A division of his army seems to have repulsed a large Scottish force at Largs (though the later Scottish accounts claim this battle as a victory), but won back the Norwegian possessions in Scotland. Haakon was wintering in the Orkney Islands, when he was ill and died on December 15 1263. A great part of his fleet had been scattered and destroyed by storms. The most important event in his reign was the voluntary submission of the Icelandic commonwealth. Worn out by internal strife fostered by Haakon®s emissaries, the Icelandic chiefs acknowledged the Norwegian king as overlord in 1262. Their example was followed by the colony of Greenland. From http://nygaard.50g.com/files/1371.htm: Håkon IV was the King of Norway who consolidated the power of the monarchy, patronized the arts, and established Norwegian sovereignty over Greenland and Iceland. His reign is considered the beginning of the "golden age" (1217-1319) in medieval Norwegian history. Acknowledged as the illegitimate posthumous son of Haakon III and the grandson of Sverrir of Norway, Håkon was reared at the court of Inge II and, on Inge's death in 1217, was proclaimed king by the Birchlegs (Berkebeiner), the adherents of Sverrir. Doubts of his paternity, especially by the ecclesiastical leaders, were allayed after his mother passed through an ordeal of hot irons (1218). The early years of his reign were disturbed by uprisings in the eastern region of the country by workers and wealthier freeholders, who opposed domination by landed aristocrats. After the insurrections had been crushed, Håkon's elder kinsman Earl Skuli Baardsson, who had chiefly conducted the government, attempted to gain sovereignty for himself. When Haakon's efforts to conciliate him failed, Skuli revolted openly and proclaimed himself king but was quickly defeated and killed by Håkon's forces (1240). In 1247 the king was crowned, in a ceremony then rare in Norway, by the pope's legate. Håkon improved the efficiency of the royal administration and also gained passage of laws prohibiting blood feuds and regulating church-state relations as well as the succession to the throne. His treaty with Henry III of England in 1217 was the earliest commercial treaty known in either nation. He also concluded a commercial treaty with the important north German trading city of Lübeck (1250) and signed a Russo-Norwegian treaty defining the northern boundary between the two nations. By acquiring sovereignty over Iceland and Greenland in 1261-62, he attained the greatest extension of the Norwegian Empire. The two colonies agreed to accept Norwegian rule and taxation in return for a trade guarantee and maintenance of civil order. In 1263 Håkon sailed to the Scottish Isles to protect the Norwegian possessions of the Isle of Man and the Hebrides against a threatened attack by Alexander III of Scotland. After a few skirmishes, Håkon retired to the Orkney Islands, where he died. Also known as a patron of the arts, Håkon sponsored a Norse version of the medieval romance of Tristan and Iseult; many other French romances were published in Norse versions during his reign. A biography, Hákonar saga Hákonarsonar, was written after his death by the Icelandic chronicler Sturla Thórdarson (d. 1284).

From EB: Haakon IV (Haakon Haakonsson), 1204-63, king of Norway (1217-63), illegitimate son of Haakon III and grandson of Sverre. Secretly reared by the Birkebeiner faction (see Sverre), he was chosen king (1217) on the death of Haakon III's successor, King Inge. Haakon Haakonsson overcame the rival claims of Earle Skule (Inge's brother), and in 1223 a great council at Bergen reaffirmed his kingship. Skule, after a renewed attempt at rebellion, was slain by the Birkebeiners in 1240. Haakon, then recognized by Pope Innocent IV, was solemnly crowned in 1247 at Bergen by a papal legate. Under Haakon IV medieval Norway reached its zenith. Iceland and Greenland were acquired, and important legal reforms were carried out. Haakon's court was splendid, and Old Norse literature flowered during his reign. Snorri Sturluson lived for some time at the court. Haakon died at Kirkwall in the Orkney Islands when campaigning against Scotland. He was succeeded by his son, Magnus VI. Haakon IV Haakonsson After he became king, his mother answered doubts about his paternity by passing through an ordeal of hot irons. He established Norwegian sovereignty over Iceland and Greenland (1261-62) and died defending the Hebrides and the Isle of Man from the Scots. He was a noted patron of the arts, and his reign began the "golden age" in medieval Norwegian history. From Wikipedia: Haakon IV, surnamed the Old (1204 - December 15, 1263), was declared to be the son of Haakon III of Norway, who died shortly before the former's birth in 1204. A year later the child was placed under the protection of King Inge II of Norway, after whose death in 1217 he was chosen king. The church refused to recognize him until 1223 on the ground of illegitimacy and the Pope's dispensation for his coronation was not gained until much later. In the earlier part of his reign much of the royal power was in the hands of Earl Skule, who intrigued against the king until 1239, when he proceeded to open hostility and was put to death. The rebellion also led to the death of Snorri Sturluson. From this time onward Haakon's reign was marked by more peace and prosperity than Norway had known for many years, until in 1263 a dispute with the Scottish king concerning the Hebrides, a Norwegian possession, induced Haakon to undertake an expedition to the west of Scotland. A division of his army seems to have repulsed a large Scottish force at Largs (though the later Scottish accounts claim this battle as a victory), but won back the Norwegian possessions in Scotland. Haakon was wintering in the Orkney Islands, when he was ill and died on December 15, 1263. A great part of his fleet had been scattered and destroyed by storms. The most important event in his reign was the voluntary submission of the Icelandic commonwealth. Worn out by internal strife fostered by Haakon's emissaries, the Icelandic chiefs acknowledged the Norwegian king as overlord in 1262. Their example was followed by the colony of Greenland. Snorri Sturluson (1179 - September 23, 1241) was an Icelandic historian, poet and politician. He was twice law-speaker at the Icelandic parliament, the Althing. He was the author of the Younger Edda, which is comprised of Gylfaginning, a narrative of Norse mythology, the Skáldskaparmál, a book of poetic language, and the Háttatal, a list of verse forms. He was also the author of the Heimskringla, a history of early medieval Scandinavian history. He is also thought to be the author of Egils Saga. Snorri became involved in an unsuccessful rebellion against King Håkon Håkonsson, the King of Norway, and was subsequently killed. Note about the name: The correct spelling of the name is Snorri Sturluson. "Snorre Sturlason" is the modern Norwegian spelling, whereas "Sturlusson" is a corrupt spelling. Since Sturluson is a mere patronym and not an actual surname, Snorri Sturluson should always be referred to as either "Snorri Sturluson" or "Snorri", never as "Sturluson"

Also:
Håkon was the son of Håkon Sverresson and Inga. He was crowned in Bergen in 1247 and after the death of King Inge Bårdsson, a period of more than 100 years of quarrels for the throne came to an end.

Håkons first years were a fight for the throne as some questioned his right as king until Skule Bårdsson was killed in 1240.

In 1223 the church went out and supported his claim for the throne and in 1225 Håkon had a military campaign to Värmtland that helped to cement his own power.

Håkon build a lot of castles, churches and residences all over the country.

Håkon also issued a new law which regulated the succession to the throne. In that, it was written "God chose us to rule because of our ancestors. This is of course the beginning of the principle of heir to the throne.

Under Håkon's reign, agreements with Lübeck and Novgorod were settled, which subsequently saw Bergen become a part of the Hanse, the leading trade union of the middle-ages.

Håkon died in 1263 in Kirkwall on the Orkney Island after a campaign against the Scottish King.

Håkon married Margrete Skulisdatter, daughter of Duke Skuli (Skule) Bårdssønn and Ragnhild Kuvung, on 25 May 1225 in Norway. (Margrete Skulisdatter was born about 1212 in Norway and died in 1270 in Reins Kloster, Rissa, Sør-Trøndelag, Norway.)

Håkon next had a relationship with Kanga den Unge "the young" about 1220 in Norway. (Kanga den Unge "the young" was born about 1205 in Norway.)



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